Interview etiquette is a fine art. Once learned, and learned well, you can walk out of any interview with the confidence of having given it your absolute best shot. During the interview, there are certain things you should just never say. It’s as simple as that. You may think you’re being clever, funny, different, or exceptional, but certain behaviors can come across as abrasive, rude, and inappropriate.

Here are a few things you should never say during an interview:

“My current job sucks”

Droning on about how awful your current position is (no matter how bad it actually may be) will not put you in your new employer’s good books. They may wonder, “Will this person hate their new job just as much?” Employers are looking for someone optimistic who overcomes boredom and complacency with new, innovative ideas.

“I don’t know”

Even if you don’t know the answer to a question, you shouldn’t answer it with “I don’t know.” Honesty is crucial during the interview, but that doesn’t mean you can’t come up with a creative answer that might explain why you don’t know. It is better to admit not knowing than to lie—you just must find an engaging way to do it. If the reason is that you are nervous, ask the interviewer for a moment to think.

“Sorry I’m late”

If these are the first words that come out of your mouth during a job interview, you may have just lost an opportunity. Plan to arrive on time, and if you can, even a little early. If you show up late for the interview, it’s not setting a good example for how you might behave on the job.

“How much time off will I get?”

Employers are not interested in hearing about your vacation house in Fiji—they want to know how hard you can work. Save any detailed questions about vacation time, promotions, and working from home until after you’ve been offered a position. It’s the professional thing to do.

“Nah, I Don’t Have Any Questions”

At the end of the interview, it’s common practice for interviewers to ask you if you have any questions. This is your chance to wow them with a stellar, calculated question that they weren’t expecting. Asking questions shows that you are invested in the position, and can think on your toes.

If you’re the type to carefully craft your answers before a job interview, make sure you consider which topics are appropriate, and which you shouldn’t mention.

For help building or editing your resume and finding out some good questions to ask at your interviews, get in touch with Tim at Fast and Focused Resume Service. You’ll land jobs faster than you ever have before. Contact me today.